Posts filed under ‘Uncategorized’

Indigo dyeing results

After many rinses these are my indigo dyed pieces from the weekend, what a huge learning curve!

Our first day was spent making up our individual vats and preparing fabric so that it could dry overnight.

On the second day we began by dyeing a gradation. My pieces had 1 dip (+soda ash dip), 1 dip indigo vat, 5 dips indigo vat, 8 dips indigo vat. It is amazing how much these lightened after all the rinses, however my ipad photos are not showing them as dark as they actually are.

We then worked on our own projects using fabric we brought with us. I stitched up some curved lines using running stitch and overhand stitch:

I also stitched a circle which was pulled up tightly and secured then covered with plastic to give a beautiful moon:

And a silk ombre scarf with one dip all over and 2 or 3 extra dips on the ends:

I am looking forward to the arrival of the portable heating element so I can do more indigo dyeing. Next up will be some Bengal muslin (bought to support the stitching project in India from Ballarat Fibre Forum) for a Traveller’s Blanket with Dijanne Cevaal.

Advertisements

November 7, 2018 at 5:41 pm Leave a comment

Indigo Dyeing in the forest

After a circuitous route via Monsalvat (amazing buildings and interesting art), Kuranga Native nursery (for some Eucalyptus cineria) and a beautiful drive through the Dandenongs I arrived at Marty & Jude’s wonderfully historic house for an indigo dyeing workshop. The house was originally used in the 1940’s as a sewing factory and then in the 50’s as a school annexe while the secondary school was extended. Jude kindly allowed me to rent her guest room for a totally immersive weekend. I woke this morning to see the resident sheep and goats quietly munching away (lawn movers and pruners).

She has a spacious room for classes, opening out onto a courtyard for messy work. Throughout the house her naturally dyed artwork sets a beautiful ambiance and her deck has the most magnificent views down to the creek. If you ever get the chance to attend a workshop at her home studio grab it. Postscript-she has space in November for a 2 day Indigo dyeing workshop.

This is preparing the indigo, with the lime and fructose ready to be added.

I will post some photos of my results tomorrow when I have finished rinsing.

This is a wonderful kimono made from workshops with the local secondary school:

Thank you Jude, I had a wonderful weekend immersed in a beautiful place.

November 4, 2018 at 9:45 pm Leave a comment

Photos for Arlee

These are the bigger photos Arlee requested.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

August 13, 2018 at 7:35 pm 1 comment

Memory workshop with Sandy Webster

Sandy Webster is visiting Australia (she is a big fan of this country) at the moment for Grampians Texture and I was lucky enough to attend a 2 day workshop at our local Studio 54.

There was not requirements list (“bring the materials you like to work with”). Sandy began with some inspirational photos and talk on her personal work on memory. She then individually tutored each person to find their oeurve (the group size of 6 was perfect). I have been working on memory pieces on my maternal grandmother over the last few years as she was my mentor, teacher and inspiration for embroidery and textile work.

A while back I developed a ‘deep map’ for an exhibition in Sydney so I have decided to continue this with a series of ‘pictorial maps’ on the women in my family whose stories have influenced and inspired me.

It took a while for me to crystallise a direction for this and start but I now have a clear vision for the development of this piece and will continue to work slowly, writing down the oral stories from my mother in a journal as I go. I am hoping the memories and stories from my mother will help with the details.

Sandy does sometimes teach a travel journal workshop and had an example with her, I think a hand made bound journal to record the ‘woman’s perspective’ of their historical story would be perfect.

‘The containing piece will consist of a map holder. Traditionally the explorers used leather containers of some sort, mine will be a cylindrical holder made using ‘paper leather’ on natural dyed cotton, more embellishment to come.

Map holder

I have started my ‘deep map’ with the story beginning from the time my Grandmother married and moved from her family home to her husband’s family farm. She experienced both hardship and joyful times and I am looking forward to slowly recording these in word and picture. The next stage will be future maps to record my own mother’s story as the young family moved off the farm (leaving it to the two youngest, unmarried brothers) and into a big town for secondary and further education and employment to support the family.

The map so far includes the family farm (Wattle Lodge) and will include the buildings of this little country town that were important to my grandmother’s story, incorporating fragments of my grandmother’s embroideries and other handwork.

2018-03-121

I look forward to continuing the storying. Thank you Sandy and Kerrie for a most inspiring weekend and the opportunity to meet up and spend time with a such a wonderful group of  artists.

March 12, 2018 at 11:02 am Leave a comment

Some natural dyeing and printing results

After my experimentation with some old op shop cottons and linens which had been soy mordanted a while ago, I got some muddy colours and very little print.

The red flowered gum leaves, blossoms and nuts gave a good coloured dye after cooking for an hour and then leaving for 24 hours. I strained the plant material from the water, added some alum to the pot, soaked the cottons in water for an hour and then bundled up. The cottons and a couple of scrap pieces of bridal satin were used with the leaves from the pot, some melaleuca sprigs and some eucalyptus cineria that had been soaked in rainwater. Some of the cooked leaves were dipped in iron water, most of the bundles were tied with silk tape around bamboo sticks, two were bundled around iron rods.

IMG_9273

After reading Irit Dulman’s latest blog post I will try a bit more experimentation this week-thank you Irit for sharing some of your processes, we would love to see you in Australia!

I am thinking now of dyeing my upcycled linen dress in onion skins first and then try the overprint with the leaves. I will do a few more samples and see how they turn out before committing to the dress.

IMG_9275

Onions skins and bark cooking

I will pop a few pieces in the pot tomorrow.

 

October 1, 2017 at 9:13 pm Leave a comment

Printing, marbling, felting & more-a catch up

We have had some great plays on fabric recently at our GeeTAG group. Our fifth Saturday play day at Shearer’s Arms studio has enabled us to spend extended time on messy play. At our April messy day we tried lino and meat tray prints, stencilling using brusho, printing with a variety of materials, marbling on fabric, flour paste resist and a technique using textas and methylated spirits to colour fabric.

Printing, stencilling & colouring

My marbled fabric, centre bottom, was a little grainy as it was the first pull of the ink off the carrageenan. After a couple of prints the clarity improved. The flour paste resist is something I will experiment with more (right top) and the top left was our regular Saturday meeting, topic: Stitch on paper, where we made paper fabric using a variety of papers pasted onto calico. I also aged my paper with a few dabs of walnut ink when I got home.

Nuno felting

Our March meeting was nuno felting and I made the piece above for the front cover of my book, the 2017 “Choose your own adventure’ project for GeeTAG. I have just dyed some more fleece in walnut ink to make another piece for the back cover.

Auditioning threads

Above you can see a glimpse of the gum nut panel I have been working on for Dijanne Cevaal’s ‘Aussie Bush’ project. I have added some organza over the design, framed it with some of my natural dyed, printed silk, FME’d and will add some hand stitch elements. I dyed some silk in walnut ink for the binding but it is not as dark as I would like so I may re-immerse that again to get a nice dark frame for the work.

May 28, 2017 at 1:24 pm Leave a comment

Messy printing day

This year in our GeeTAG group we decided to take advantage of the months which had 5 Saturdays and designate them as messy offsite days. Earlier in the year Kerrie mentored a group in a wonderful eco dyeing and printing day and on the 5th Saturday in October we offered a messy printing day at the Shearer’s Arms Gallery studio. This is a fabulous space to ‘get down and dirty’ with paints, something we cannot do in the pristine room we normally use for our monthly meetings.

Many of our group lugged numerous items along for a day of experimenting and playing with prints. It was great to have a day to print uninterrupted by the normal duties of family life and be inspired by my fellow printers, who shared and discussed all ideas freely. There is a write up and photos of many of our results n the GeeTAG blog.

I experimented with the Gelli plate and hot glue gun stencils, creating paper and fabric prints, experimented with circles of all types to create a ‘doodle cloth’ on a cotton cloth from the Op Shop (I may use this for embroidering TAST stitches), and trying out a few of the blocks from other participants.

Glue gun prints, a borrowed block print-printed twice to give the layered image, stencilled image using part of a plastic doily over a mop up cloth:

Printing Day

Backgrounds created from the gelli plate, various objects printed and stencilled, glue gun stencils used as resist with spray paints:

Printing experiments

Overall a fun and successful day of printing.

November 5, 2016 at 5:24 pm 2 comments

Older Posts


Pages

August 2019
M T W T F S S
« Jun    
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031  

Notebook Project